Academic Affairs

Academic Advisement

Each new student should meet with the staff in the Academic Success Center prior to registering for classes. Returning students should meet with their assigned advisor each semester to be sure that they remain on track with their chosen program of study. Students should follow the programs of study outlined in the catalog, complete courses in the proper sequence, and take infrequently offered courses when they are scheduled.


Bainbridge State College publishes registration procedures and a schedule of classes online each semester prior to registration. For the most recent version of the schedule, please check the College’s website at www.bainbridge.edu.

Students who wish to change majors, concentrations, or advisors must notify the Office of the Registrar.

It is the responsibility of students to meet with their advisors; to read this catalog, official announcements, official bulletin boards, other pertinent official publications, Bainbridge State College student email, and the Student Handbook; and otherwise to inform themselves completely in regard to their program of study, credits, degree requirements, quality points, graduation requirements, and school policies in all programs.

Academic Renewal

Academic Renewal beginning January 1, 2015

Students readmitted or reinstated to any USG institution after a period of absence of three (3) calendar years or longer are eligible to apply for Academic Renewal. Eligible students must apply for Academic Renewal within twelve months of their readmission. Academic Renewal signals the initiation of a new grade point average for determining academic standing; while students will receive credit for past classes in which they made a C or higher, the grade is not counted for GPA purposes. The Academic Renewal student has a new cumulative GPA in addition to other GPAs that may be recorded.

Any student who was enrolled at a USG institution can apply for academic renewal (as long as he or she meets the time out requirement) when the student returns to a USG college. Students denied academic renewal may appeal the decision to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, who will appoint an Academic Appeals Committee comprising the Registrar and two faculty members to hear the appeal.

Contact the Bainbridge State College Registrar for more information.


Academic Status

Academic Honors: A student with a semester grade point average of 3.5 or higher on 12 or more semester hours of course work (excluding learning support classes) earns placement on the Dean's List for the semester. A student with a semester average of 3.5 or higher on between 7 and 11 semester hours of course work (excluding learning support classes) earns placement on the Honors List.

Academic Alert: A student whose semester grade point average is between 1.5 and 1.8 will be placed on Academic Alert. Students on Academic Alert are encouraged to speak with their assigned advisor.

Academic Warning: When a student's semester grade point average is below 1.5, the student is placed on Academic Warning. Students on Academic Warning should make arrangements to meet with their assigned academic advisor, who will (1) assist in the design of a schedule of courses deemed beneficial to the student's academic progress, (2) examine educational and personal alternatives and options with the student, and (3) discuss suspension possibilities regarding cumulative grade point averages.

Academic Probation: A student whose cumulative grade point average is below the minimum acceptable level as listed in the following table will be placed on Academic Probation.

Cumulative Semester Hrs Attempted
(Including Transfer Hours Earned)

Minimum Acceptable
Cumulative GPA

1-12

1.20

13-27

1.50

28-42

1.80

43 or more

2.00

Students on Academic Probation should make arrangements to meet with their assigned academic advisor, who will (1) assist in the design of a schedule of courses deemed beneficial to the student's academic progress, (2) examine educational and personal alternatives and options with the student, and (3) discuss suspension possibilities regarding cumulative grade point averages.

Academic Suspension: A student whose cumulative grade point average falls below the minimum acceptable level (as indicated in the above table) for two semesters in succession will be placed on Academic Suspension. The following exception applies: A student whose semester GPA is 2.0 or higher will be placed on Continued Academic Probation for the next semester of attendance. A student placed on Academic Suspension may not attend Bainbridge State College during the subsequent semester unless an appeal is made and granted by the Appeals Committee. If the student does not attend for one semester, he or she may re-enroll without following the appeals process. A student who receives an Academic Suspension on three separate occasions shall not be eligible to re-enroll for one calendar year from the time the third suspension becomes effective.

Appeals: Students placed on Academic Suspension shall have access to the College's appeals procedure. A review of the appeal will occur upon notice from the student to the Vice President for Academic Affairs that he or she wishes to appear before the Appeals Committee on the scheduled date for academic appeals. A record of the hearing will be available to the student upon request.

The appeals process occurs only at the student's request and is not automatically implemented. Students whose appeals are granted may be limited in their course registration and may be required to complete workshops through the Tutoring Center.

Class Attendance

Regular and punctual attendance at all classes is a student's responsibility. At the beginning of the semester, all distributed course syllabi include specific policies relative to absences. Online classes also have attendance policies as specified in their course syllabi. Student absences for official extracurricular activities in which the student is representing Bainbridge State College must be negotiated well in advance with the student's individual faculty members, who will weigh student class performance, scheduled class activities, and other, related issues associated with considering the request.

Attendance is established and defined by the instructor of each course since Bainbridge State College does not have an institutional-wide policy on attendance. However, Bainbridge State College does have a first-week attendance reporting policy for Financial Aid that requires instructors to report students’ first week attendance in all classes, including those that meet only online. Students who are reported as not attending are dropped from their classes.

Students who stop attending or who exceed the number of absences stated on a class syllabus in a class with an attendance policy may be withdrawn from that class.

Withdrawal after midterm will result in an automatic "WF" unless a "W" is approved by the instructor and the vice president for Academic Affairs for an non-academic hardship. Students applying for a hardship withdrawal should contact Ridge Harper, Director of Student Success and Retention.

Class Load and Overloads

A schedule of 12 or more semester hours of credit constitutes a full-time load. Fewer than 12 semester hours is classified as a part-time load. If a student wishes to schedule more than 18 semester hours (an overload), he or she must obtain approval from the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Students seeking such permission must demonstrate that they are likely to succeed based on their performance in previous semesters.

Noncredit courses or audited courses do not count in determining an overload. No student may enroll in more than twenty-four hours of credit during a given academic semester.

Credit by Examination

Bainbridge State College recognizes that learning may result from a variety of individual vocational studies, occupational experiences, and general life encounters as well as from formal classroom instruction. The College is therefore committed to assessing prior learning experiences. These assessments take several forms.

Departmental Challenge Exams: Students may gain credit for assessment of prior work experience, military courses or experience, courses taken at non-accredited institutions, courses not intended for transfer credit, and other educational experiences.  Students can demonstrate college-level learning by passing an approved end-of-course challenge exam, which may include both written and hands-on components. Students may not take a challenge exam for a course they have previously failed at this institution, and students who are currently enrolled in a course are not eligible to take the associated challenge exam in that semester. The fee for challenge exams is $50 per test. Students should contact their academic advisor to arrange testing. There is no provision for a retest.


College Level Examination Program (CLEP): The CLEP program is a product of the College Entrance Examination Board. CLEP examinations are administered through the Testing Center. The student must purchase test materials for each test taken. The award of credit is governed by the following regulations:

  1. Up to 17 credit hours of CLEP credit may count toward a degree at Bainbridge State College. Such credit will be recorded on the student's record in the same manner as transfer credit with the symbol "K" assigned.
  2. No credit will be awarded on the basis of an examination taken more than twice after initial enrollment.
  3. Credit will be given for courses for which a prerequisite is a requirement only after such prerequisite(s) have been satisfied.
  4. The College Entrance Exam Board, as of the Summer 2013 semester, charges an $80 fee for the test materials. Bainbridge State College charges a test administration fee of $15. Both fees must be paid prior to the student taking the exam. CLEP testing fees are subject to change without notice.

Directed Independent Study

A student may request a Directed Independent Study (DIS) only if each of the following requirements are met:

  • the student is within 16 hours of graduating,
  • the student will be graduating in the semester of the DIS,
  • the student has a minimum of a 2.0 GPA,
  • the class is not being offered that semester, or the class time(s) conflict with another required class,
  • the student receives permission from the Dean, and
  • the Dean can identify an appropriate instructor for the DIS.

Faculty are limited to teaching one DIS per semester. The DIS may have a maximum of two students.

Students and faculty agreeing to a DIS must sign a contract that must be approved by the Dean of the School. This contract will specify why the DIS must be taught and how the content will be controlled to ensure that the student receives appropriate instruction. The contract will specify the responsibilities of the student and include information pertaining to any required meetings. The course syllabus should be attached to the contract. The student, instructor, Dean, and Academic Affairs office will each receive a copy of the signed contract.

Early Alert/Always Alert

Early Alert identifies those students who are at risk of failing within the first quarter of the semester (within four weeks for fall and spring and within two weeks for summer) so that they have time to counteract unsatisfactory progress and are offered resources to help them succeed. Students who are reported by their instructors for an Early Alert or Always Alert will be contacted by Academic Success Center advisors to inform them of faculty concerns (or congratulations) and share with them how to access support services.

Honors Program

Consistent with its historical mission, Bainbridge State College maintains a commitment to excellence to the service area by offering outstanding programs that positively affect the region’s citizens. To further this goal and to ensure academic excellence at the institution, BSC faculty members and administrators have worked together to create an Honors Program for outstanding students who might otherwise leave the area to attend other colleges and universities.

With regard to the specific mission of Bainbridge State College, the institution places primary emphasis on excellence in instruction, always striving to evolve student learning and to continue to provide a superior academic environment. To that end, the Honors Program offers highly motivated students the opportunity to work one-on-one with faculty in their area of expertise on projects of the student’s choosing. The Honors Program also offers a rich cultural and personal-growth experience, including travel to important historical and cultural sites, book discussions, and other public events.

Eligibility:

  • Minimum SAT score of 1000 and minimum high school GPA of 3.5 or minimum BSC GPA of 3.5 after one semester (or 12 hours) at Bainbridge State College

Requirements:

  • Students complete at least 15 credit hours (5 classes) of honors courses.
  • To remain eligible, students must maintain at least a 3.25 grade point average at BSC and fulfill the requirements of the program.

Students who complete the requirements of the Honors Program will receive an honors designation on their permanent transcript in addition to an honors seal on their Bainbridge State College diploma. For more information, students should meet with the Honors Director.

Foundations for Success—FYE 0100

In the first semester of enrollment, new part-time and full-time students are required to complete the FYE 0100 Foundations for Success course. Re-admitted students who have not yet earned credit in FYE 0100 will also be required to enroll in FYE 0100 in their first semester of enrollment. Students who do not pass FYE 0100 must retake it during their next semester(s) of enrollment. Students may not withdraw from FYE 0100 unless they withdraw from all classes

Transient students, transfer students (those students with 30 or more transfer hours who are not required to meet freshman admission standards), joint enrollment students, special students (students with a bachelor’s degree), CTDL students, and students auditing their courses are not required to enroll in FYE 0100. Any other exceptions must be documented by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. In addition, students not required to enroll in FYE 0100 may elect it.

Students may take an online section of FYE 0100 only if they have exited or exempted ENGL 0099 and READ 0099.

Grading System

The grading system used at Bainbridge State College is as follows:

Letter Grade

Nature of Work

Quality Points

A

Excellent

4.0

B

Good

3.0

C

Satisfactory

2.0

D

Passing

1.0

F

Failing

0.0

FN

Failing by attendance—no longer used

0.0

W

Withdrawn (no academic penalty)

not computed

WF

Withdrawn Failing

0.0

I

Incomplete

not computed

V

Audited

not computed

IP*

In Progress (Learning Support courses)

not computed

K

Credit by Examination

not computed

S*

Satisfactory

not computed

U*

Unsatisfactory

not computed

*The grades "S," "U" and "IP" earn institutional credit that in no way affects the cumulative grade point average.

Laboratory Courses

Any laboratory class involves some risk. Bainbridge State College exercises extreme care in its laboratory programs to protect the safety and health of laboratory students. Safety procedures include the refusal to allow the use of College facilities without appropriate supervision, the hiring of qualified instructors, the inspection of equipment and work areas on a regular basis, the acquisition of the safest material consistent with available resources, the supervision of class activities, and the individualization of programs of activity consistent with each student's current health or physical condition. By participating in supervised laboratory classes, students specifically waive Bainbridge State College of liability for injuries.

Learning Support

Learning Support is a generic term for courses designed to prepare students for, or to assist students with, collegiate work. Learning Support is intended to serve students who need additional support in mathematics or English (reading/writing). Students enrolling in Learning Support courses are those who do not meet criteria to exempt Learning Support placement or those who elect to enroll in Learning Support courses in order to prepare for core curriculum courses. 

Registration: During each semester of enrollment, a student with Learning Support requirements must first register for all required Learning Support courses before being allowed to register for college-level classes, including classes used to satisfy CPC deficiencies. This policy applies to full-time and part-time students. Exceptions (only as allowed by the Board of Regents) must be documented with written approval from the Vice President for Academic Affairs. 

Two exceptions are possible:

  • If a student places in both math and English Learning Support and is enrolled in at least one Learning Support course, FYE 0100  or a physical education course may be taken that semester instead of the required Learning Support course in the other area.
  • In the event that a required Learning Support course is not available, a student may enroll in a course for degree credit if the student has met the prerequisite requirements, subject to the written approval of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.


Courses with Learning Support Prerequisites or Corequisites

Students who are required to enroll in Learning Support courses are not permitted to enroll in credit courses that require the content or the skills of the prerequisite courses, as shown in the Courses listing in the Catalog. The following core curriculum areas require students to complete or exempt certain Learning Support requirements.

  • Students required to enroll in ENGL 0989 may not take online classes numbered 1000 and above.
  • Completion or exemption from ENGL 0989 is a prerequisite for Social, Natural, and Physical Science courses. 
  • Completion or exemption from ENGL 0989 or placement into corequisite English is required for placement into college-level English courses.
  • Completion or exemption from MATH 0987 or MATH 0989 or placement into corequisite mathematics is required for placement into college level mathematics courses.
  • Completion or exemption from MATH 0987 or MATH 0989 is a prerequisite for physics and chemistry courses. 
  • Any courses with prerequisite of any other college-level course would require exit or exemption from related Learning Support requirements. 


Evaluation for Learning Support Placement beginning Summer 2015

When COMPASS testing is required, the COMPASS Math test will be used for math placement.  The COMPASS Reading and COMPASS e-Write (2 -12) tests will be used for English placement.

A Mathematics Placement Index (MPI) and an English Placement Index (EPI) will be calculated based on High School Grade Point Average (HSGPA), SAT or ACT, if available, and the COMPASS placement test.

Indices will comprise the following:

  1. HSGPA and SAT/ACT - when both are available
  2. HSGPA and COMPASS - when SAT/ACT are not available
  3. COMPASS - when neither HSGPA nor SAT/ACT is available

EPIs and MPIs will be calculated as listed below, in priority order for calculation. That is, if available, SAT or ACT and High School Grade Point Averages (HSGPA) must be used in the calculations.

For the purposes of calculating placement indices, scores should be no older than the maximums listed below.

Measure or 

Score

Recommended 

Maximum “Age”

SAT/ACT

7 years from date of administration

HSGPA

5 years from date of graduation

COMPASS

1 year from date of administration

Students with EPIs and MPIs equal to or greater than the minimum collegiate placement index scores listed below will be placed directly into the appropriate gateway college course(s). Note that because a higher level of preparation is required for success in Math 1111, a higher MPI will be required for direct placement into that course.

Minimum Collegiate Placement Index Scores

English

Mathematics

ENGL 1101

MATH 1001

MATH 1111

4230

1165

1265


Students with placement indices less than the minimum collegiate placement index will be placed into co-requisite or Foundations-level Learning Support.

Students who score below the floor scores in both English and mathematics will be denied admission to the AA and AS degree programs unless they have offsetting scores (see below). 

The floor scores for the two indices are as follows:

Floor Scores

EPI

MPI

3032

928


 

 

 



If the EPI is 
less than 3032 AND the MPI is less than 928, then student cannot be admitted to an AA or AS degree, unless they have an offsetting score as explained below.

Students who score below the floor index score in only one area may be admitted the AA or AS degree if their scores in the other area are equal to or greater than the offsetting index score listed below.

Minimum Offsetting Placement Index

EPI

MPI

3905

1028

  • If the EPI is less than 3032, then the MPI must be greater than or equal to 1028.
  • If the MPI is less than 928, than the EPI must be greater than or equal to 3905.

English Placement Index (EPI):

EPI Score

Placement

4230 & above

ENGL 1101

3860 – 4229

ENGL 1101 paired with ENGL 0999

3859 & below

ENGL 0989 Foundations of English

Math (NON-STEM) Placement Index (MPI):

EPI Score

Placement

1165 & above

MATH 1001

988 – 1164

MATH 1001 paired with MATH 0997

987 & below

MATH 0987

Math (STEM) Placement Index (MPI):

EPI Score

Placement

1265 & above

MATH 1111

1033 – 1264

MATH 1111 paired with MATH 0999

1032 & below

MATH 0989

 

Changing Math Pathways

Changing from the Algebra-Calculus Pathway to the Non-Algebra Pathway

Students who have successfully completed the Foundations-level course for the Algebra-Calculus Pathway and switch to the Non-Algebra pathway will not require additional remediation. They can enroll for the gateway non-algebra mathematics course with corequisite remediation. 

Changing from the Non-Algebra Pathway to the Algebra-Calculus Pathway

Students who have successfully completed the Foundations level course for the Non-Algebra Pathway and switch to the Algebra-Calculus pathway can enroll in MATH 1111 with mandatory corequisite support if both of following conditions are met:

  • The student passes the BSC pretest for College Algebra.
  • The student has made a grade of A or B in the Non-Algebra Foundations course

Students not meeting both of the above conditions will be required to take the Foundations course leading to College Algebra before being allowed to enroll in College Algebra with corequisite support.


Grades for Learning Support in Corequisite Courses

Students will exit Learning Support upon successful completion (a grade of C or higher for ENGL 1101, MATH 1111, and MATH 1001; a grade of D or higher for TECH 1140) of the gateway college course.  Students remain in Learning Support until they have successfully completed the gateway course(s).  Therefore, Learning Support students must register for the both the gateway and corequisite courses every semester until they successfully complete the collegiate course. 

  • Students’ grades in the corequisite courses need not be the same as their grades in the gateway courses.
  • Students who pass the corequisite courses but do not successfully complete the gateway college courses must repeat both the corequisite course and the gateway course.
  • There is no limit on the number of attempts that students may have in corequisite Learning Support courses.
  • Students who pass the gateway collegiate courses exit Learning Support even if they do not pass the corequisite support course.

 

Pass corequisite

Fail corequisite

Pass collegiate

Exit Learning Support

Exit Learning Support but receive failing grade for coreq course

Fail collegiate

Remain in LS; repeat coreq and collegiate course

Remain in LS; repeat coreq and collegiate course


Learning Support Attempts and Exit

An attempt is defined as an institutional credit course in which a student receives any grade or symbol except “W."

  • If an AA or AS student does not complete requirements for Foundations-level English or mathematics in two attempts, he or she will be suspended for a calendar year. Suspended students may be considered for readmission before the end of one year if they can provide evidence that they have taken measures to improve their skills. 
  • There are no limits on attempts in corequisite Learning Support courses.
  • Students have two attempts to pass Vocational Math (TECH 0085). A grade of IP counts as one attempt; however, a grade of WF or U counts as two attempts. Students who do not pass TECH 0085 within two attempts will be suspended from BSC for one semester without appeal.
  • AA and AS students who have been suspended from the institution without completing Learning Support requirements may enroll in an AAS program at BSC or complete their Learning Support requirements and additional collegiate-level work at SACSCOC-accredited TCSG institutions during the year of suspension.
  • Students will exit Learning Support by successfully passing the corresponding Area A collegiate-level course: a grade of C or higher for ENGL 1101, MATH 1111, and MATH 1001; a grade of D or higher for TECH 1140.


Learning Support Rules for Returning Students 

Students who leave BSC or any USG school for any reason may be re-admitted without Learning Support requirements if they meet one of the following conditions:

  • Students have completed all Learning Support requirements at a SACSCOC TCSG institution and completion of Learning Support requirements is documented on their TCSG transcript.Students have earned transferable credit with a grade of "C" or higher at a regionally-accredited non-USG institution for ENGL 1101 or 1102 (for completion of the Learning Support English requirement) or an Area A mathematics course (for completion of the Learning Support Mathematics requirement).
  • Students have completed Learning Support at another USG institution, and completion of Learning Support requirements is documented on their transfer transcript

Students who leave BSC or any USG school and return without having satisfied their Learning Support requirements in the interim may be readmitted to the college under the following conditions:

  • Students who have been suspended from BSC for a calendar year for failure to complete Foundations-level Learning Support within two attempts have two options on their return.
      • Students may return to placement in Foundations-level Learning Support and have two more attempts.
      • Students may take the COMPASS test and accept Learning Support placement according to a placement index calculated on the basis of COMPASS alone. If placed in Foundations-level Learning Support, they will have two more attempts to complete this level.
  • Students in Learning Support who voluntarily leave BSC or any USG institution for periods of less than one calendar year will return to the level of Learning Support (Foundations-level or corequisite) they were in immediately prior to their absence. 
      • Time spent in Learning Support course work in a disciplinary area is cumulative within the USG. Students who return to an institution less than one calendar year after one attempt in Foundations-level Learning Support will return on their second attempt in Foundations-level Learning Support. 
      • Students who had completed requirements for Foundations-level Learning Support and had been recommended for corequisite Learning Support may reenter at the corequisite support level. 
  • Students in Learning Support who voluntarily leave BSC or any USG institution for periods of one calendar year or more must be retested with the COMPASS in any previously unsatisfied Learning Support area.
      • Such students may be readmitted without a Learning Support requirement if they meet the institutional criteria for exemption.
      • Students who do not score high enough on the COMPASS test to exempt Learning Support may be placed in either Foundations-level or corequisite Learning Support, depending on institutional placement policies.
      • Students placed in Foundations-level Learning support may be readmitted and allowed up to two additional attempts in Foundations-level Learning Support in both English and mathematics, as applicable, if individual evaluation indicates that the student has a reasonable chance of success on readmission. Students readmitted under this provision are subject to the 30-hour limit on college-level coursework and may not take credit work if they had earned 30 or more credit hours during their previous period(s) of enrollment and have not completed Learning Support requirements in the interim.

Completion of transferable Area A courses in English or mathematics from any institution will eliminate further Learning Support requirements in that area upon transfer back to a USG institution.


Withdrawing from Learning Support Courses
Students enrolled in gateway collegiate courses with co-requisite support may not withdraw from either course without withdrawing from both. Students who withdraw from the corequisite and gateway courses will not, however, be required to withdraw from other collegiate courses not directly related to the Learning Support requirement.

30-Hour Rule: Students who have accumulated a maximum of 30 semester hours of college-level credit and have not successfully completed required Learning Support courses may enroll only in Learning Support courses until requirements are successfully completed. Students with transfer credit or credit earned in a certificate or prior degree program who are required to take Learning Support courses for their current degree objectives may earn up to 30 additional hours of college-level credit. After earning the additional hours, such students may enroll in Learning Support courses only.

Documented Learning Disabilities: Students with documented learning disorders as defined in the USG Academic Affairs Handbook, Section 3.11.1 who are required to enroll in LS must fulfill all stated requirements, including the COMPASS exit (or its alternative through Adult Education) and course requirements. Students will be provided with appropriate test and/or course accommodations as described in USG Section 3.11.5, Learning Support Considerations. Appropriate course and testing accommodations will be made for students with sensory, mobility, or systemic disorders. Such students may be granted up to two additional semesters of Foundations-Level Learning Support courses.

Minority Advising Program (MAP)

The Minority Advising Program (MAP) was established in 1983 to address the specific problems faced by minority students within the University System of Georgia that affect their recruitment and retention. MAP, while open to all students, is an achievement-based program designed to facilitate the transition to college for minority students. The primary initiative of MAP is to foster a more nurturing and inviting environment on campus, thereby promoting success and improving the retention of minority students. MAP provides a range of programs, such as academic counseling/referrals, seminars, speakers, mentoring, and other student support services. Most importantly, the Minority Advising Program provides students with the necessary skills and the access to resources on campus that will assist them in their academic pursuits.

Online Courses

Online Technology: Bainbridge State College is wired for computing technology. Every office is equipped with computer resources with Internet and email connections. Numerous computer classrooms, most of which are networked and connected to the Internet, enhance instruction, support individual student research, and allow for personal enrichment. A staff of five to six people assists with these computing resources and supports the College's computer-driven processes. Other equipment/services include webpages, servers, scanners, and computer-based tutorials.

Bainbridge State College offers many online and partially online courses through our web-based course system, GeorgiaVIEW. Similarly, the University System of Georgia makes available some courses through the GeorgiaOnMyLine initiative. Fully online classes are labeled “WEB,” and courses that split instructional time between face-to-face instruction in the classroom and instruction via the Internet are labeled “hybrid” courses in the class schedule available on the College website. Contact the Admissions Office for details.

Physical Education Requirements

Safety and First Aid (PHED 1020) OR Wellness (WELL 2000) is required of students in most programs of study. Students seeking a transfer degree to a baccalaureate program must also complete one credit hour of an activity course to be selected from a wide variety of offerings. Students in applied science degree programs, career diploma programs, and technical certificate programs are exempt from the physical education activity course requirement.

Physical education grades are computed in the same manner as all other grades in determining grade point averages for honors, graduation, and related purposes. The grading system for physical education is the same as for all other courses at Bainbridge State College.

Regardless of age, students in Associate of Arts programs of study will complete the required physical education activity course unless specifically exempted. Students with special problems, physical limitations, or disabilities should consult with a member of the physical education faculty for assistance in selecting an appropriate activity course or seeking an exemption.

Any physical activity involves some risk. Bainbridge State College exercises extreme care in its physical education program to protect the safety and health of physical education students. Safety procedures include the hiring of qualified instructors, the inspection of equipment and work areas on a regular basis, the acquisition of the safest material consistent with available resources, the supervision of class activities, the refusal to allow the use of College facilities without appropriate supervision, and the individualization of programs of activity consistent with each student's current health or physical condition. By participating in supervised physical education classes, students specifically waive Bainbridge State College of liability for injuries.

All students are required to dress appropriately for all physical education classes as determined by the nature of the activity. At the beginning of each course, instructors will inform students about the appropriate dress for that particular course.

Schedule Adjustments

Students may adjust their schedules at any time prior to the start of the semester through the normal registration process. For assistance with schedule adjustments prior to the start of the semester, students should meet with their academic advisor.

Drop/Add: After the start of the semester, students may drop or add courses without penalty for the first two days of the academic calendar only.

Financial aid awards are based on enrolled hours as of the end of the Drop/Add period and will not be increased due to courses added after that date. Dropping a course after financial aid has been awarded may result in a requirement to return funds awarded for that class. For information and assistance with the Drop/Add process, students should meet with their assigned academic advisor. Students who receive financial aid should meet with their financial aid counselor prior to making schedule adjustments. The deadline to drop or add classes through this process is the close of business on the end date of the drop/add period as published in the College calendar.

Withdrawals: Once the Drop/Add period has ended, a student may withdraw from a course by the designated midterm date published in the College calendar. Students who officially withdraw by the midterm date will receive a "W" grade for the term. However, any student who wishes to withdraw from 50% or more of his or her classes before midterm must meet with an academic advisor in the Academic Success Center before the withdrawal form can be processed.

The "W" grade is not computed in the student's grade point average but may affect a student's eligibility for financial aid. To officially withdraw from a course, students must file the appropriate paperwork with the Registrar. The deadline to drop/withdraw from classes with a course grade of “W” is the midpoint of the semester as published in the College calendar.

Late Withdrawals: Students who withdraw from a course or courses after the published midpoint of the semester will receive a grade of “WF”. A “WF” will be computed as a 0.0 in the student’s grade point average (GPA), just as if the student had received an “F”. The deadline to late withdraw from classes with a course grade of “WF” is the last day of classes for the semester as published in the College calendar.

Hardship Withdrawals: Students who wish to withdraw after midterm for reasons of non-academic hardship may petition the Vice President for Academic Affairs to receive a grade of “W”. A non-academic hardship is an event (such as illness, injury, death, or employer-initiated job change) that prevents the student from completing his or her course(s). This event must occur during the semester of the request and at or after the published deadline to withdraw for the semester. Students should be prepared to provide documentation of the hardship.

It is especially important for students to communicate with their instructors if they are experiencing difficulties. The final decision for issuing a “W” or “WF” is at the discretion of the instructor and may be based on the student’s performance up to the time of the hardship.

To file for a hardship withdrawal, a student should contact the Registrar. Hardship withdrawal forms can also be picked up in the Office of Academic Affairs.

The deadline to seek a “W” through this process is the midpoint of the semester (as published in the College calendar) following the term in which the course or courses were taken. Exceptions to this deadline may be made for extenuating circumstances.

Faculty-Initiated Withdrawals: Students who exceed the number of absences stated on a class syllabus may be withdrawn from the class by the instructor. The Office of Financial Aid will calculate what amount, if any, the student must repay because of his or her failure to attend class based on Return to Title IV (r2t4).

Units of Credit

The unit of credit is the semester hour. A semester hour represents fifty minutes of class time per week for one 15-week semester or its equivalent. Two to three hours of laboratory work may be considered to be the equivalent of one semester hour of credit. Students are also expected to complete two to three hours of study outside of class for each semester credit hour assigned to the course.